28 Days Of Black History Day #2 Prince Hall

Prince Hall (1735 – 1807)[1] was an African American noted as a tireless abolitionist, for his leadership in the free black community in Boston, and as the founder of Prince Hall Masonry.
Hall tried to gain New England’s enslaved and free blacks a place in Freemasonry, education and the military, which were some of the most crucial spheres of society in his time. Hall is considered the founder of “Black Freemasonry” in the United States, known today as Prince Hall Freemasonry. Hall formed the African Grand Lodge of North America. Prince Hall was unanimously elected its Grand Master and served until his death in 1807.
He lobbied for education rights for black children and was active in the back-to-Africa movement. Many historians regard Prince Hall as one of the prominent African-Americans during the early years of the United States
Hall encouraged enslaved and freed blacks to serve the American colonial military. He believed that if blacks were involved in the founding of the new nation, it would aid in the attainment of freedom for all blacks.[5][6] Hall proposed that the Massachusetts Committee of Safety allow blacks to join the military. He and fellow supporters petition compared Britain’s colonial rule with the enslavement of blacks. Their proposal was declined.[6][7]
England issued a proclamation that guaranteed freedom to blacks who enlisted in the British army. Once the British Army filled its ranks with black troops, the Continental Army reversed its decision and allowed blacks into the military.[citation needed][8] It is believed, but not certain, that Hall was one of the six “Prince Halls” from Massachusetts to serve during the war.[1] His son, Primus, was a Revolutionary War soldier, having enlisted at the age 19.[4]
Having served during the Revolutionary War, many African Americans expected, but did not receive, racial equality when the war ended. With the intention of improving the lives of fellow African Americans, Prince Hall collaborated with others to propose legislation for equal rights. He also hosted community events, such as educational forums and theatre events to improve the lives of black people.[6]
Many of the original members of the African Masonic Lodge had served during the Revolutionary War

You may also like...