Philip Emeka Emeagwali the SUPERCOMPUTER PIONEER

Philip Emeagwali (born in 1954) is a Nigerian-born engineer, mathematician and computer scientist/geologist who was one of two winners of the 1989 Gordon Bell Prize, a prize from the IEEE, for his use of a Connection Machine supercomputer to help analyze petroleum fields.
Emeagwali was born in Akure, Nigeria on 23 August 1954.[1] His early schooling was suspended in 1967 due to the Nigerian-Biafran war. When he turned fourteen, he served in the Biafran army. After the war he completed a high-school equivalency through self-study. He travelled to the United States to study under a scholarship after taking a correspondence course at the University of London.[citation needed] He received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Oregon State University in 1977. During this time, he worked as a civil engineer at the Bureau of Land Reclamation in Wyoming. He later moved to Washington DC, receiving in 1986 a master’s degree from George Washington University in ocean and marine engineering, and a second master’s in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland.[2]
He is married to Dale Brown Emeagwali, a noted African-American microbiologist.
Emeagwali received a $1,000[4] 1989 Gordon Bell Prize, based on an application of the CM-2 massively-parallel computer for computational fluid dynamics (oil-reservoir modeling). He won in the “price/performance” category, with a performance figure of 400 Mflops/$1M, corresponding to an absolute performance of 3.1 Gflops. The other recipient of the award, who won in the “peak performance” category for a similar application of the CM-2 to oil-related seismic data processing, actually had a price-performance figure of 500 Mflops/$1M (superior to what Emeagwali had achieved) and an absolute performance of 6.0 Gflops, but the judges decided not to award both prizes to the same team.[5][6] Emeagwali’s simulation was the first program to apply a pseudo-time approach to reservoir modeling.[7]
Emeagwali was voted the “35th-greatest African (and greatest African scientist) of all time” in a survey by New African magazine.[8] His achievements were quoted in a speech by Bill Clinton as an example of what Nigerians could achieve when given the opportunity.[9] He is also a frequent feature of Black History Month articles in the popular press

Bill Clinton on Emeagwali inventions

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